Chapter Ten

Max Werdin

Exercises:

1.      Write a job description for Kevin Ulrich, the project manager described in the opening vignette of this chapter.  Be sure to identify characteristics of the ideal candidate, as well as work experience and educational background.  Also, justify why your job description is suitable for potential candidates of this position. In order to fulfill this position, one must be proficient in networking, basic computer operations and applications, network security and an understanding in basic programming. The project manager will be required to ensure that all tasks and projects are completed within the allotted budget and timeframe as well as maintaining the project progress despite whatever hurdles may present themselves.

2.      Search the Web for job descriptions of project managers.  You can use any number of Web sites, including www.monster.com or www.dice.com, to find at least 10 IT-related job descriptions.  What common elements do you find among the job descriptions?  What is the most unusual characteristic among them? While reviewing different job descriptions, there were a few terms or phrases that were persistent throughout the majority of them. Some of which were “coordinate internal resources and third parties throughout the execution of the project, ensure resource availability, report and escalate to management as needed”. I would say that these items pretty well encapsulate what is required of a project manager.

 

Case Exercises:

1.     Kelvin should reanalyze his top tier priorities into something more manageable for the rest of the team to accomplish. He should also talk to some of his coworkers and drum up some support for the coming changes.

2.     The change management tasks that Kelvin should complete prior to the next meeting are to reevaluate his requirements and to gain support from others within his workplace. Thus resulting in a better and smoother outcome from the next meeting.

3.     If I had been in his position, I would have talked to my superiors prior to the meeting and gotten their feedback. I feel this would have eliminated the risk of overwhelming everyone when I introduced them to the plan.

Ethical Decision Making:

 I wouldn’t say that he had an ethical lapse while preparing the figures as they are within the range of what is to be expected. Especially considering that one can’t ever be certain what the expenses will be until the project is complete. If he were to have made up the numbers to better play into his desires, that would be completely unethical as it is falsifying information that the superiors will be using to make decisions thus resulting in poor decision making at no fault of their own.